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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The manuscript should not have been published or submitted for publication elsewhere.
  • The manuscript file is written in Microsoft Word format (.doc, or .docx).
  • The manuscript file is anonymized (please do not include your name and affiliation).
  • The manuscript adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

Author Guidelines

All submissions (about 5,000–7,500 words, bibliography excluded) should be submitted electronically via e-mail (at rivistadivein@unibo.it) and should be formatted according to the Author Guidelines of DIVE-IN – An International Journal on Diversity and Inclusion. All manuscripts should include two abstracts (around 150 words) both in English and in the language of the article and 5 keywords in English.

The style adopted by DIVE-IN – An International Journal on Diversity and Inclusion is a free adaptation of the Unified Style Sheet for Linguistics Journals

Authors are kindly invited to write the articles using the template of the Journal (.docx).

All articles should observe the following editorial guidelines when submitted for review:

Margins

Style: 2.54 cm top, 2.54 cm bottom, 2.54 cm left, 2.54 cm right

Title

Style: Times New Roman, point 15, single spacing, bold, centred

Subtitle

On a new line under Title.

Style: Times New Roman, point 15, single spacing, bold centred

Author

Separated from Subtitle by an empty spacing line.

Style: Times New Roman, point 12, single spacing, centred.

In case of multiple authors, names are separated by commas.

Affiliation

On a new line under Author.

Style: Times New Roman, point 11, single spacing, centred

Abstract

Separated from Affiliation by two empty spacing lines.

Text in English / the language of the article, 120 words.

Style: Times New Roman, point 11, single spacing, justified.

 

Keywords

Separated from Abstract by an empty spacing line.

Five keywords separated by semicolons.

Style: Times New Roman, point 11, single spacing justified.

Sections

Separated from Keywords by two empty spacing lines.

Section heading Style: Times New Roman, point 12, bold, justified. 

Sub-sections

Separated from Section by an empty spacing line.

Sub-section heading Style: Times New Roman, point 12, italics.

Body

Separated from Section and Sub-section headings by an empty spacing line.

First lines in new paragraphs are indented by 1 cm.

Style: Times New Roman, point 12, single spacing, justified.

Tables/figures/graphs

Separated from Body by an empty spacing line.

In-text reference to tables/figures/graphs should be inserted between the brackets, for example (see Table 1). 

Captions are separated from tables/figures/graphs by an empty spacing line.

Caption Style: Times New Roman, point 10, single spacing, centred. 

Numbered examples

Separated from Body by an empty spacing line.

Style: Times New Roman, point 12, single spacing, italic, justified.

If examples are not written in English (or more generally, in the language of the article), they should be translated. Single quotation marks are used for translations.

Translation Style: Times New Roman, point 12, single spacing, justified. In-text reference to numbered examples should be inserted between the brackets, for example (see (1)).

Footnotes

Used only when the information adds substantially to the discussion and they should be concise. Footnote numbers should be inserted after punctuation.

Footnotes Style: Times New Roman, point 10, single spacing, justified.

In-text citations

Works are cited by including the author-year reference in the primary text, for example, Goldberg (1995) or by backgrounding references in parentheses (Marotta 1984; Cangemi & D’Imperio 2015). In case of more than two authors, the name of the first author is followed by “et al.” (no italic), for example, Johnson et al. (1989).

Double quotation marks are used when short excerpts (less than 3 lines) are cited in the text, maintaining the Body style (Times New Roman, point 12, single spacing, justified).

In case of longer excerpts (more than 3 lines), the citation is separated from the body by an empty line of spacing. The font of the quoted excerpt is reduced; Style: Times New Roman, point 11, single spacing justified. 

Italics

Used only in these cases: numbered examples; titles of books, journals and films (e.g. To Kill a Mockingbird); metalinguistic references to technical terms (e.g. It is called word embedding.); foreign words (e.g. One of them is nasi goreng.).

Italics are not used for common loanwords (e.g. ad hoc, corpus, raison d'être, etc.).

Numbers

All numbers from zero to one hundred are spelled out in nontechnical writing (e.g. He wrote twelve novels before 1974).

In technical articles, numbers are generally spelled out (e.g. Romanian has 20 phonemic consonants).

However, when a sentence begins with a number, it should always be spelled out (e.g. Sixty participants completed the trial).

Punctuation

Punctuation should be consistent throughout the paper and it should observe the specific norms of the language of the article. Nevertheless, the following rules are mandatory in all cases:

  • The dash (“–”) denotes a major break or pause (e.g. The author presented his theory – the first of its kind – during the keynote address) and it should not be overused.

  • The Oxford comma should be avoided, unless it resolves ambiguity in sentence (e.g. He enjoyed going on long walks with his dogs, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Hermann Oldenberg.).

  • The colon is only used to introduce a list (e.g. The Eastern Romance subgroup: Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian and Istro-Romanian) and to introduce a direct quotation of more than 3 lines.

  • The ampersand (“&”) is only used in text if a cited work is written by two authors (e.g. Bertinetto & Loporcaro 2005) or the ampersand is part of a proper name, such as a trademarked corporate titles (e.g. Simon & Schuster).

Grammar and spelling

Grammar must be accurate.

Spelling must be accurate and consistent throughout the article. American English and British English spelling should not be mixed.

References

Heading called References or Bibliography separated from Section by an empty spacing line.

References Style: Times New Roman, point 12, bold, justified.

The entries mentioned in the paper are listed alphabetically, separated by an empty spacing line.

The style adopted by DIVE-IN – An International Journal on Diversity and Inclusion is a free adaptation of the Unified Style Sheet for Linguistics Journals

Here are some examples of five standard types of references: books, journal articles, articles in edited volumes, articles in proceedings and PhD theses:

Books

Goldberg, Adele. 1995. Constructions: A Construction Grammar Approach to Argument Structure. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Marotta, Giovanna. 1984. Aspetti della struttura ritmico-temporale in italiano. Pisa: Edizioni ETS.

Journal Articles

Bertinetto, Piermarco & Loporcaro, Michele. 2005. “The sound pattern of Standard Italian, as compared with the varieties spoken in Florence, Milan and Rome”. Journal of the International Phonetic Association 35(2). 131-151. 

Flege, James E. 1989a.  “Differences in inventory size affects the location but not the precision of tongue positioning in vowel production”. Language & Speech 32. 123-147.

Flege, James E. 1989b. “Chinese subjects’perception of the word-final English /t/-/d/ contrast: Performance before and after training”. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 86. 1684-1697.

Johnson, Kyle & Baker, Mark & Roberts, Ian. 1989. “Passive arguments raised”. Linguistic Inquiry 20. 219–251.

Perek, Florent & Hilpert, Martin. 2017. “A distributional semantic approach to the periodization of change in the productivity of constructions”. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 22(4). 490-520. 

Zhao, Yuan & Jurafsky, Dan. 2009. “The effect of lexical frequency and Lombard reflex on tone hyperarticulation”. Journal of Phonetics 37. 231-247.

Articles in Edited Volumes

Cangemi, Francesco & D’Imperio, Mariapaola. 2015. “Sentence Modality and Tempo in Neapolitan Italian”. In Romero, Joaquin & Riera, Maria (eds.), The Phonetics-Phonology Interface: Representations and methodologies, 109-123. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 

Articles in Proceedings

Chiari, Isabella & De Mauro, Tullio. 2014. “The New Basic Vocabulary of Italian as a linguistic resource”. In Basili, Roberto & Lenci, Alessandro & Magnini, Bernardo (eds.), Proceedings of the First Italian Conference on Computational Linguistics (CLiC-it 2014), 113-116. Pisa: Pisa University Press.

PhD Thesis

Jilka, Matthias. 2000. The contribution of intonation to the perception of foreign accent. Identifying intonational deviations by means of F0 generation and resynthesis. Stuttgart: University of Stuttgart. (Doctoral dissertation).

Articles

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